how to find court date for traffic ticket – Seminole

how to find court date for traffic ticket

Types of Traffic Tickets

If you’re someone who drives, it’s important for you to know what actions can result in a traffic ticket. While most traffic offenses are infractions, which are minor crimes, they can still have negative consequences. Traffic violations can result in expensive tickets, higher insurance rates, and possibly suspension of your driver’s license. Some traffic violations can even result in a misdemeanor or felony charges. FindLaw’s section on Types of Traffic Tickets offers general information for the most common traffic laws and violations. Since each state has its own traffic rules, this section also provides links to state laws for various violations when the law is available.

Speeding

Whether you’re late for an appointment or just eager to get to where you’re going, chances are that you’ve driven over the posted speed limit. For this reason, speeding is one of the most common reasons for a traffic ticket. There are actually three types of speeding limits: absolute, presumed, and basic.

An absolute speed limit is the most common type of speed law. An example of an absolute speed limit is when a sign states that the speed limit is 65 mph. Under this type of speed limit, a person who goes even 1 mph over the posted speed limit has violated the law.

A presumed speed limit is a system that’s only used in certain states, such as California and Texas. This system allows people to legally drive over the speed limit as long as they drive safely. For example, if a person drives 40 mph in a 35 mph zone, the driver is “presumed” to be violating the speed law. However, the judge could acquit the driver if he or she is able to convince the judge that the driving conditions made driving over the speed limit safe.

Finally, the basic speed theory states that you can violate the basic speed law even if you drive at the posted speed limit. In this situation, an officer can decide that driving the speed limit is unsafe given the driving conditions. For example, if it’s raining heavily it can be unsafe to drive 65 mph, even if that’s the speed limit.

Leaving the Scene of an Accident

One of the more serious traffic offenses is leaving the scene of an accident, also known as a hit and run. Generally speaking, the law requires that people involved in an accident pull over when it’s safe to do so and exchange contact or insurance information. While the procedures after an accident vary from state to state, they are usually based on what type of damage occurred.

If a person hits an unattended car or stationary property, most states usually require that the driver leave a note with his or her contact information. If there are injuries involved, drivers usually have a duty to take reasonable steps to help the injured person, and report the accident to the police. A person who doesn’t follow the proper procedures after an accident can receive a traffic ticket at minimum. If a driver leaves the scene of an accident where an injury or death occurred, it can result in serious criminal charges, including a possible felony charge.

Hiring a Lawyer

Usually a simple traffic ticket doesn’t require help from an attorney. However, if you have questions or feel that your situation is complicated, you might want to contact a traffic ticket attorney. If you’ve been charged with a more serious traffic violation, it’s in you best interest to contact a criminal defense attorney.

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Learn About Types of Traffic Tickets

how to find court date for traffic ticket

how to find court date for traffic ticket

The Seminole are a Native American people originally from Florida. Today, they principally live in Oklahoma with a minority in Florida, and comprise three federally recognized tribes: the Seminole Tribe of Oklahoma, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, as well as independent groups. The Seminole nation emerged in a process of ethnogenesis from various Native American groups who settled in Florida in the 18th century, most significantly northern Muscogee (Creeks) from what is now Georgia and Alabama. The word “Seminole” is derived from the Muscogee word simanó-li, which may itself be derived from the Spanish word cimarrón, meaning “runaway” or “wild one”.

Seminole culture is largely derived from that of the Creek; the most important ceremony is the Green Corn Dance; other notable traditions include use of the black drink and ritual tobacco. As the Seminole adapted to Florida environs, they developed local traditions, such as the construction of open-air, thatched-roof houses known as chickees. Historically the Seminole spoke Mikasuki and Creek, both Muskogean languages.

The Seminole became increasingly independent of other Creek groups and established their own identity. They developed a thriving trade network during the British and second Spanish periods (roughly 1767–1821). The tribe expanded considerably during this time, and was further supplemented from the late 18th century by free blacks and escaped slaves who settled near and paid tribute to Seminole towns. The latter became known as Black Seminoles, although they kept their own Gullah culture. After the United States achieved independence, its settlers increased pressure on Seminole lands, leading to the Seminole Wars (1818–1858). The Seminole were first confined to a large inland reservation by the Treaty of Moultrie Creek (1823) and then forcibly evicted from Florida by the Treaty of Payne’s Landing (1832). By 1842, most Seminoles and Black Seminoles had been removed to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. During the American Civil War, most Oklahoma Seminole allied with the Confederacy, after which they had to sign a new treaty with the U.S., including freedom and tribal membership for the Black Seminole. Today residents of the reservation are enrolled in the federally recognized Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, while others belong to unorganized groups.

Perhaps fewer than 200 Seminoles remained in Florida after the Third Seminole War (1855–1858), but they fostered a resurgence in traditional customs and a culture of staunch independence. In the late 19th century, the Florida Seminole re-established limited relations with the U.S. government and in 1930 received 5,000 acres (20 km2) of reservation lands. Few Seminole moved to reservations until the 1940s; they reorganized their government and received federal recognition in 1957 as the Seminole Tribe of Florida. The more traditional people near the Tamiami Trail received federal recognition as the Miccosukee Tribe in 1962.

Seminole groups in Oklahoma and Florida had little contact with each other until well into the 20th century, but each developed along similar lines as the groups strived to maintain their culture while they struggled economically. Old crafts and traditions were revived in the mid-20th century as Seminoles began seeking tourism dollars when Americans began to travel more on the country’s growing highway system. In the 1970s, Seminole tribes began to run small bingo games on their reservations to raise revenue, winning court challenges to initiate Indian gaming, which many U.S. tribes have adopted to generate revenues for welfare, education, and development. The Seminole Tribe of Florida has been particularly successful with gambling establishments, and in 2007, it purchased the Hard Rock Café and has rebranded or opened several large gaming resorts under that name.

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